Community Living

There are many aspects of community life at Flatlanders Inn.  We’ve chosen to mention a few here.

See below for info on everything from monthly room/board rates to food and community activities … and lots of stuff in-between!

 

Morning Prayer

During the week, we often begin  our day with prayer.  Morning prayer is simple and liturgical in style,  involves reading the Bible and devotional materials, as well as prayers for others.

Deep Clean

Living together in community and sharing spaces necessitates regular times of cleaning.  Once a week, we gather to maintain and care for our home.  We meet to decide who wants to do which chores (sweeping, mopping, etc.) and spend about 2-3 hours working to keep things spic and span.  There’s often music and laughter and though it does require time and effort, it tends to be rather enjoyable community time.  After deep clean, we celebrate our work together by having a community brunch.

Community Meals

Eating together is an integral part of community life.  Though we often cook and eat together anyway, we have several regular, scheduled community meals together each week.  Each member/resident of Flatlanders Inn is part of a cooking team that plans and prepares the meal each for one of these meals.  Each Saturday, we have brunch together following Deep Clean.

House Meeting

Once a week, we gather to discuss various goings-on, concerns, events, and details of living together.  We keep track of decisions and discussions and distribute house meeting notes to everyone. We also spend some time “checking in,” where we share what’s been going on in our weeks and how we’re doing.

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Food, Finances, and Space

Food

While food is certainly a matter of taste and flavor, it is also a matter of nutrition.  We try to eat healthily; treating our bodies as gifts means being mindful of what goes into them.  We also recognize that food is both a local and global justice issue.  Our preference is fair trade and we try to support local businesses (when we buy produce, we try to buy North American-grown if it’s available and do our weekly shopping at a local supermarket).

Because protein is available in other, much cheaper sources and also for health and environmental reasons, we consciously choose a meat-reduced diet.  Meat is a luxury item we usually save for community meals (though this doesn’t mean every meal will have meat).  Our grocery budget is very limited (this is one of the ways we keep rent low!), and we are glad for the opportunity to shop and eat on a shoe-string as it helps us remain mindful of the realities of our neighborhood.  Winnipeg’s North End is one of Canada’s poorest neighborhoods and we don’t mind living and eating in similar ways to our friends and neighbours.

A note about food preferences: in a community of 25+ people sharing meals, it becomes near impossible to accommodate preferences.  Some members choose to supplement what is available in the community kitchens, with their own food purchases. In general, the community budget can’t be tailored to individual preferences.

Finances

All community members contribute financially to Flatlanders Inn.  Expectations are discussed and arrangements are made with people prior to their moving in. These are the room and board rates effective Jan. 1, 2014.  We increase the rate by 1% every January.

  • Single:  $480 / month for room and board
  • Couple: $682 / month for room and board
  • Family: $783 / month for room and board

Rental fees include: private room, private or shared bathroom, food/meals, phone (including voice mail), security system, parking, internet, laundry, utilities, exercise equipment, shared entertainment system.

Space

In total, Flatlanders Inn occupies over 10,000 square feet between two floors.  Every member of the community has some personal space and shares the common spaces (kitchens, living rooms, dining areas, etc.), the décor and upkeep of which we all contribute to.  And in the spirit of community living, even if your room is on one floor, we assume you also ‘live’ on the other.

There are three kinds of rooms at Flatlanders Inn:

  1. Dorms – up to three people of the same gender.  There are three individual rooms in the dorms, each equipped with furnishings and a single bed.  Shared bathroom.
  2. Double units – ideal for married couples or single parents with one to two young children/babies.  Each room is equipped with furnishings and either two twin beds or a double bed.  Private bathroom.
  3. Family units – two or three bedrooms with private living and kitchen area.  As these units necessitate families finding the right balance between ‘family time’ and community participation, availability will be discussed as part of the application/discernment process.
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